2 December 2017
Filed under News, Photos   No Comments

From Hollywood child star to modern ingenue, Dakota Fanning’s rise to success has been seamless and without scandal. She tells Martha Hayes where it all went right.

Dakota Fanning on Hollywood
‘It always cracks me up when people talk about how I haven’t gone off the rails − which I have not, by any means − but you know, I’m a normal person. I love a party and I love having people over for any occasion since I’ve had my own apartment in New York. I’m always like, “You can stay with me!” I don’t cook, but I make cocktails. I make a good margarita.’

Comfily dressed in a navy ribbed sweater and slouchy navy sweatpants, Dakota Fanning has just flown in from Budapest, where’s she’s spent the last six months filming psychological period drama series The Alienist. Described by Netflix as ‘a headstrong secretary determined to become the first female police detective [in 1870s New York],’ Sarah Howard sounds like a dream of a role for Fanning’s first foray into the golden era of television.

Her commitment and attachment not only to the part but to the cast (including Luke Evans and Daniel Brühl) and crew, makes me warm to her quickly. Not just because, on a superficial level, she sounds really fun (‘On one of the first nights they threw an event and
 I stole all the actors and took them back to my apartment. That was my first party…’) but because she talks with an honesty and sincerity when she could so easily be more jaded.

She is a stickler for routine, and while signing up for a six-month TV show could be daunting, she admits she found it comforting. ‘I like knowing where I’m going to be and making myself at home. [I] work so hard to get comfortable and get to know people. I love the life I’ve had in Budapest.’

As a result, she found reaching the end of the project quite emotional. ‘When you wrap your scenes, the producer or director might say a little something about you. And when they did, I just burst into tears and sat there crying in front of the entire cast and crew.’ (more…)